Call for Submissions

The doctoral work in progress seminar (DocWIP) is a regular event run by the Vienna Doctoral School of Philosophy (VDP), co-organized by Flora Löffelmann and Jackson Sawatzky.

DocWIP provides an informal space for doctoral researchers to present ideas, receive comments, and socialize with their peers. It is designed to help build a close-knit doctoral community, in which researchers can benefit from each others' knowledge, support, and constructive criticism. Meetings typically take place on Wednesday afternoons, once a month, in Neues Institutsgebäude (NIG). For meeting links, email updates, or requests to take part, please contact Flora Löffelmann (flora.loeffelmann@univie.ac.at) or Jackson Sawatzky (jackson.sawatzky@univie.ac.at). Presentations can be given in either English or German.

The projected dates for this semester are the 2 November, 30 November, 11 January, and 1 February. Unless requested otherwise, the time will be 16:45-18:45. This will allow a maximum of 30-45 minutes for a presentation, a short break, and then time for a Q&A. Students preparing for their faculty presentation (FÖP) are also encouraged to present, as are masters students who wish to give a talk on their thesis or receive feedback on ideas for future doctoral research.

We strongly encourage interlocutors and presenters from all areas of philosophy, and especially from underrepresented groups, to (regularly) attend these sessions.

If you like to present at the DocWIP, we kindly request that you contact us with your preferred dates. Nearer to the time of your presentation, we would also request that you send a title and abstract, in order that we can forward information about your talk to our community.


Call for Papers for the 44th INTERNATIONALE WITTGENSTEIN-SYMPOSIUM 2023 in Kirchberg am Wechsel from 6–12 August 2023
"100 Years of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus – 70 Years after Wittgenstein’s Death: A Critical Assessment"

Find more information here.


Fast Forward Science – the competition

 

The Fast Forward Science competition, which is endowed with a total of €23,000, is a joint project of Wissenschaft im Dialog and the Stifterverband and has been held annually since 2013.

Passion for research, for innovative multimedia formats and for communication – the Fast Forward Science competition honors people who are not only passionate about science themselves, but who can also inspire others. Whether you are a student, postdoc, vlogger or communicator: We call you to produce social media posts about scientific topics and submit them to us.

Prizes will be awarded to contributions that present current research, are easy to understand, are tailored to the target a large audience, and offer the necessary “aha” effect. A special challenge is that the contributions are entertaining despite the hard facts and ideally manage to enter into a dialog with the viewers.

The deadline for submissions is February 7, 2023. Submit your entry now!

 

 

Call for Papers: Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice

Hybrid Conference: 30 & 31 March 2023
Place: Academy Palace (Paleis der Academiën) - Rue Ducale 1, 1000
Bruxelles/Online (Zoom)
Homepage: https://sites.google.com/view/wittgenstein-meets-pmp/startseite

Please send in abstracts till 31 January 2023 (see more information below).
Registration for in-person participation is open till 28 February 2023, online Registration is open till 25 March 2023.

Topic: In 1944 Ludwig Wittgenstein wrote that his "chief contribution ha[d] been in the philosophy of mathematics" (Monk, 1990,p. 466). Oddly enough, however, as opposed to his other philosophical contributions, his writings and lectures on mathematics have remained largely uncharted if not misconceived. The peculiarity of the matter becomes even more apparent, when we realize that the bulk of his oeuvre past 1929 was devoted to the topic.

What comes to the front, when examining these remarks on mathematics, is Wittgenstein's insistence on understanding mathematics as a 'human invention' or 'anthropological phenomenon' set within and driven by a certain community. Mathematics is an activity; a practice that constructs "various ways of seeing conceptual possibilities and empirical situations, proof and logical methods central to its progress". (Floyd, 2021)

Interestingly, in recent years, a subset of philosophers of mathematics have concerned themselves with the practice of mathematicians, instigating what is now known as the 'philosophy of mathematical practice' (PMP). Among these philosophers, Wilder (1950, 1981), Pólya (1945, 1954, 1962), Lakatos (1976) and Kitcher (1984) are often mentioned as initiators of this movement, although PMP has mainly by driven in the last 20 years by the influential monographs and collected by the likes of Van Kerkhove (2007, 2009) and Van Bendegem (2007), Löwe and Muller (2010), Mancosu (2008), Ferreirós and Gray (2006), Giaquinto (2007) and Macbeth (2014), among many others.

The aim of this conference is to investigate the historical, present and future significance and influence of Ludwig Wittgenstein to the Philosophy of Mathematical Practice, bridging the gap between both scholarships.

Speakers:
Sorin Bangu (University of Bergen)
Gisele Secco (Universidade Federal de Santa Maria) [Online]
Jordi Fairhurst (KU Leuven)
José Antonio Pérez Escobar (ENS Paris)
Wim Vanrie (University of Ghent)
Karim Zahidi (University of Antwerp)
More contributed talks!

Call for Abstracts / Registrations
We envision this conference mainly as an activity with in-person exchange, so we strongly motivate contributed speakers to join us in person.

There is no participation fee for online participants, There might be at most a small fee for in person participants. We might need ask you to cover your own food at the conference venue (around 20 EUR), we have no funds to cover travel or accommodation.

Please register / apply via this google form: https://forms.gle/dSQd8jivcs2RvQLc9
A short abstract (at most 250 words) is required.

Organizers
Senior organizers: Bart Van Kerkhove and Erik Weber;
Junior organizers: Deniz Sarikaya and Vincent M. P. Vincke

Support
We are thankful for the support by the Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science at the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts. We expect to announce further supporters soon on the homepage.

Contact Information
For any questions, please contact the organizers by sending an email to: Vincent.Michel.Vincke@vub.be or deniz.sarikaya@vub.be

For up to date information see also the webpage: https://sites.google.com/view/wittgenstein-meets-pmp/

Call for contributions: Technology & Language | Special topic: "Mimesis and Composition"

The ninth issue of "Technology and Language" has appeared, and with it a new call for contributions that appeals primarily to the study of computer metaphors, philosophy of mind, histories of cognitive science and technology, modelling practices.
https://soctech.spbstu.ru/en/issue/9/

www.philosophie.tu-darmstadt.de/T_and_L [3]

The current issue "Mimesis and Composition" presents a collection of papers associated with the Padova Summer School on Philosophy and Cultural Studies of Technology (Natascha Adamowsky and Fabio Grigenti, guest editors). It includes several explorations of the relation of technology and magic e.g. in regard to charismatic research programs (Mareike Smolka), on the mythical aura of the digital (Benedetta Milani), on New Phenomenology, sound, and atmospheric art and technology (Irina Oznobikhina). Natascha Adamowsky contributes a paper on play as a mode of experimentally exploring the world, others are dedicated to Santa Claus, Walter Benjamin, urban smellwalks, and the technical performance of magic. The issue concludes with a pair of papers on biomimesis and principles of composition, biorobots and gardenworks (Astrid Schwarz and Marco Tamborini).

Any papers and interdisciplinary explorations at the interface of technology and language are welcome. The next deadline for submitted papers in English or Russian is 1 February 2023 - these may include issues of science and fiction, the literary and artistic treatment of technological catastrophes, the languages of tastes and smells. Always welcome are contributions that explore the expressive qualities of technical design: how do prototypes as well as archaeological artefacts speak to us?

 

Other open calls:

„Mythologies. The Spirit of Technology in its
Cultural Context"
(Deadline March 15, 2023): This special issue is concerned with technological developments in relation to state sponsorship and how these implicate myths of progress. Simultaneously, we wish to explore how scholars have explored technological determinism and critiqued techno-cultural imaginaries of national destiny. By republishing Nichola Berdyaev's 1933 essay "Humanity and the Machine" alongside new critical discussions, we hope to stimulate significant analysis of the modern myths of technology and transformations of humanity, treating technology in its broadest sense as including material, digital, medical devices and systems. Following on from Benjamin and Barthes, we would like to explore how myths of immortality, renewal, heroism and community coalesce around toys, plastics, and advertisements for the amenities of modern life. The different use of technologies in response to Covid 19 has amplified the difference of national attitudes in national contexts, raising anew "The Question concerning Technology" in Europe, Russia, China, or the United States. (Guest editors: Coreen McGuire and Natalia Nikiforova)

"Future Writing" (Deadline: 5 June 2023): Starting from a Derridean grammatological review of the act of writing today, this special issue invites us to consider writing-the-future along with the future-of-writing. While most science fiction and utopian texts typically query the future, some also develop symbols and codes, technologies of writing, a whole new language. The question is framed by our contemporary experience: Writing and the memory of the hand are becoming obsolete by way of typing and other technical proxies. At the same time, Chinese, Arabic, Roman typographies assume a new visuality and transformative power that veers toward the asemic, reminding us of enactment and embodiment in the digital world. Emancipated from the demand for readability, they re-claim the value of an a-synchronized togetherness - a technical as well as aesthetic value. (Guest editors: Dajuin Yao and Nikita Lin, originating from an intermedia investigative project by Dajuin Yao and the Open Media Lab at the School of Intermedia Art, China Academy of Art)

New Call for Contributions: "Computational Models and Metaphors of the Mind" (Deadline: 5 September 2023) Is the meaning of a text accessible to machine learning? Questions like these have become ever more puzzling. Mind, behavior, and machine are configured differently at different times, in different research programs. This concerns questions of intelligence, technology, and language: What is consciousness, is it possible to artificially reproduce it? What is a language in terms of information theory and data models? Can a language be expressive without ontology or semantics? How significant are shared features of brains and computers - e.g. neural networks, and how significant are the differences between human and machine intelligence - e.g. conceptual vs. statistical thinking? (guest editor: Pavel Baryshnikov)

Queries, suggestions, and submissions can be addressed to soctech@spbstu.ru or to Daria Bylieva (bylieva_ds@spbstu.ru) and Alfred Nordmann (nordmann@phil.tu-darmstadt.de).

 

Queries, suggestions, and submissions can be addressed to soctech@spbstu.ru or to Daria Bylieva (bylieva_ds@spbstu.ru) and Alfred Nordmann (nordmann@phil.tu-darmstadt.de).

Call for Papers: The Is and Ought of Business Ethics

Empirical Evidence and Normative Arguments brought into Dialogue
3rd Wittenberg Business Ethics Conference & 1st Doctoral Satellite Workshop

4–6 October 2023 (Wittenberg Centre for Global Ethics)

Research on morals and business abounds. The last decades have yielded fascinating insights on how individuals and organisations do behave and have brought forward sound arguments on how they should behave. But there is still a great gap between those working primarily empirically, and those working primarily normatively. On the one side, scholars mainly in areas such as management, behavioural ethics, and behavioural economics, focus on analysing the IS of moral judgments and behaviour, without addressing the normative implications of their positive work. On the other side, normative business ethics scholars focus on the OUGHTs of judgement and behaviour, without systematically discussing empirical restrictions on the individual and contextual levels. In our view, positive and normative scholars of business ethics do not talk as much as they could and should. Therefore, the interdisciplinary conference "The Is and Ought of Business Ethics: Empirical Evidence and Normative Arguments brought into Dialogue" aims to be a dialogue platform between empirically and normatively working business ethicists from different disciplines. We invite papers from the empirical or normative side of the debate, from any related discipline (economics, management, psychology, philosophy, etc.), and methodological background (behavioural experiments, survey data, positive and normative theory, etc.). All papers should critically reflect on the limits of their methodological approaches, bring empirical and normative findings into exchange and/or sketch future collaborative research between empirical and normative business ethicists.         

Einreichungen über:
https://survey.ethicalcloud.de/index.php/683589?lang=en
Deadline: 20.2.2023

Call for Papers: AI, Human Values and Meaningful Human Control

In our everyday life, we are often exposed to outputs of AI-powered machines that impact our living environment, our way to see the world, and our life in general. Sometimes, machines are designed to allow just a predetermined range of possible reactions, limiting the users' decisions and their liberty to explore other ways to react to their output. Even in those cases in which machines are not designed with the intent of impacting human choices or values, their outcome might bear unexpected consequences for human values' formation and consolidation.

The conference which will take place on 22 and 23 June at the University of Bonn aims at addressing ethical issues of the impact of machines on human choices and value formation. Another important line of questioning will concern human oversight and control of autonomous systems. More specifically, how can humans retain meaningful human control (MHC) over these machines?

We are currently accepting abstract submissions. For more information on the conference topic and possible lines of questioning, see the call for abstracts: https://www.cst.uni-bonn.de/en/research/cfa-ai-and-human-values.pdf or contact Sergio Genovesi: genovesi@uni-bonn.de

Call for Abstracts: The Second Kantian Foundations of Democracy (KanDem) Conference

Organizers: Michael Kryluk, Elisabeth Widmer

When: 31 August and 1 September 2023
Where: IFIKK, University of Oslo

Keynote Speakers:
Howard Williams (Cardiff University)
Frederick Beiser (Syracuse University)

Theme: Progressivism and Conservatism in Kantian Political Philosophy
Kant has often been called a “moderate” political thinker. On the one hand, he builds his political philosophy on the innate right of humanity that pertains to all human beings. This provides an egalitarian foundation on which he condemns the permissibility of slavery, colonialism, and hereditary privileges. On the other hand, Kant seems to envision a patriarchal, classist society in which women and laborers are not considered full citizens and therefore have no say in legislation. These two aspects of Kant’s political thought are also reflected in his immediate followers, who were both progressives and conservatives. While some used the Kantian framework for reactionary theories (see, e. g., August Wilhelm Rehberg, Freidrich von Gentz,…), others thought that Kant’s views were not egalitarian enough, thereby aiming to correct his political theory by placing it on more egalitarian Kantian grounds (e. g., Johann, Adam Bergk, Johann Benjamin Erhard,…).


The Second KanDem-Conference seeks to explore the theme of progressivism and conservatism in Kant’s political philosophy and his immediate followers. The conference focuses on themes including, but not limited to:
·       Kant and his immediate successors on revolution
·       Kant and his immediate successors on active citizenship
·       Kant and his immediate successors on women’s and worker’s rights
·       Kant and his immediate successors on colonialism
·       Kant and his immediate successors on hereditary privileges
·       Kant and his immediate successors on political autonomy
·       Kant and his immediate successors on political progress
·       Kant and his immediate successors on economic and property rights
·       Kant and his immediate successors on political legitimacy (of states, governments, etc.)

Although we welcome contributions that focus exclusively on Kant, we are particularly interested in presentations that approach Kant’s or Kantian political philosophy through the lens of lesser-known Kantian figures, such as Johann Heinrich Abicht, Jakob Sigismund Beck, Johann Adam Bergk, Friedrich Bouterwek, Johann Gottlieb Buhle, Johann Benjamin Erhard, Paul Johann Anselm von Feuerbach, Johann Gotlieb Fichte, Georg Forster, Friedrich Gentz, Georg Friedrich Goess, Karl Heinrich Heydenreich, Johann Christoph Hoffbauer, Ludwig Julius Friedrich Höpfner, Gotlieb Hufeland, Gustav Hugo, Wilhelm von Humboldt, Ludwig Heinrich von Jakob, Christoph Gottlob Jähne, G. F. Kellner, Karl Salomo Zachariä von Lingenthal, Friedrich von Manger, Johann Gebhard Ehrenreich Maass, Salomon Maimon, Georg Samuel Albert Mellin, Johann Heinrich Meyer, Christian Friedrich Michaelis, Johann Georg Nehr, Christoph Friedrich Nicolai, Johann Wilhelm Petersen /Jo Wilhelm Placidus, Heinrich Ludwig Pölitz, Karl Ludwig Pörschke, Elise Reimarus, Karl Leonhard Reinhold, J. C. C. Rüdiger, Johann Christian Gottlieb Schaumann, Augustin Schelle, Friedrich Schelling, Friedrich Schlegel, Theodor Schmalz, Carl Christian Erhard Schmid, Konrad Stang, Heinrich Stephani, Wilhelm Gottlieb Tafinger, Johann Heinrich Tieftrunk, K. J. Wedekind, Ferdinand Christoph Weise, and I. D.Westphal.


Call for Abstracts
We invite submissions of abstracts of 300-400 words, excluding references and footnotes. Abstracts must be prepared for blind review, but include personal information (affiliation, contact info) in the submission email. Please send your anonymized abstract to Elisabeth Widmer (e.t.widmer@ifikk.uio.no).

Deadline:
28 February 2023
Notification: 31 March 2023

Call for Abstracts: Direct Realism - Historical and Systematic Perspectives

Direct realism in epistemology and the philosophy of mind is the view that perception is not mediated by representational means such as concepts or ideas but that things are perceived directly. More recently, this position has experienced an unexpected renaissance. However, direct realism had its heydays during the first two decades of the twentieth century, especially among the "new" realists in the UK (e.g. Bertrand Russell) and the United States (e.g. Ralph Barton Perry). The aim of this Special Issue (and the preceding two-day workshop, held in late October 2022 in Mainz) is to bring together historical and systematic perspectives on the direct realist conception. It is thus hoped that both perspectives will more thoroughly benefit from each other than to date.

This Special Issue of Topoi is co-edited by Alexander Ehmann and Matthias Neuber within the context of the DFG-funded project "American Realism in the Early 20th Century". Further information on the project, the workshop, the editors, etc., can be found on our website: https://american-realism.de/.

Papers must be submitted through Editorial Manager: https://www.editorialmanager.com/topo/

Submission guidelines can be found here: https://www.springer.com/journal/11245/submission-guidelines

When submitting your paper, please select "S.I. : Direct Realism (Ehmann/Neuber)" as article type from the dropdown menu in Editorial Manager.

All contributions will undergo the standard editorial procedure of Topoi, including double-blind peer review. Papers should stay below 10.000 words in length. The deadline for submissions is 1 March 2023.

Contact Alexander Ehmann (alexanderehmann@alexanderehmann.com) for more information.

Call for Papers: Issues in Dynamic Decision Theory

Call for Papers for the Workshop on Issues in Dynamic Decision Theory organized by the Reinhart-Koselleck project "Reflexive Decision and Game Theory" of Wolfgang Spohn at the University of Konstanz

Time: 6–8 July 2023
Place: Bischofsvilla, University of Konstanz

Please find below the description of the workshop and a list of confirmed participants below. See also the project's website: https://www.philosophie.uni-konstanz.de/forschung/drittmittelprojekte/reinhart-koselleck-projekt/

There are up to 5 further slots of 30 minutes (20 minutes talk, 10 minutes discussion) for short  presentations. Everyone interested in presenting is invited to apply for participation.

For application, please submit an abstract of your talk of at most 1000 words (2 pages) and a CV till 12 March 2023. Decisions on the submissions will be made within four weeks. Those selected will be invited to participate, including a coverage of travel and accommodation costs in case they are not  supported by their institutions.

Please send your application both to: alida.muehlbauer@uni-konstanz.de and wolfgang.spohn@uni-konstanz.de

Abstract: Dynamic choice has become an important topic within the theory of rational choice (decision theory). But it has two different facets. The topic originated in economics from the problem of  (endogenous) preference change. Dynamic consistency was then considered to be a crucial  desideratum, leading to theories of sophisticated choice satisfying this desideratum. Since McClennen's important book in 1990, a different rich discussion has evolved in which dynamic consistency is rather used as a test criterion for various decision rules in a dynamic setting. The former motivation was no longer in the center. Hence, the aim of the workshop is to bring together these two strands of the
discussion and to promote an exchange between them.

The workshop will be organized by the Reinhart-Koselleck project "Reflexive Decision and Game Theory" of Wolfgang Spohn at the University of Konstanz. Its decision-theoretic part is particularly concerned with dynamic choice. This is hence the topic of the first workshop of this project. Therefore, a further aim of the workshop is to introduce the so-called reflexive perspective which is pursued within the project.

Call for contributions: Technology & Language | Special topic: „Mythologies. The Spirit of Technology in its Cultural Context"

This special issue is concerned with technological developments in relation to state sponsorship and how these implicate myths of progress. Simultaneously, we wish to explore how scholars have explored technological determinism and critiqued techno-cultural imaginaries of national destiny. By republishing Nichola Berdyaev's 1933 essay "Humanity and the Machine" alongside new critical discussions, we hope to stimulate significant analysis of the modern myths of technology and transformations of humanity, treating technology in its broadest sense as including material, digital, medical devices and systems. Following on from Benjamin and Barthes, we would like to explore how myths of immortality, renewal, heroism and community coalesce around toys, plastics, and advertisements for the amenities of modern life. The different use of technologies in response to Covid 19 has amplified the difference of national attitudes in national contexts, raising anew "The Question concerning Technology" in Europe, Russia, China, or the United States.

Guest editors: Coreen McGuire and Natalia Nikiforova
Deadline: 15 March 2023

 

Other open calls:

"Future Writing" (Deadline: 5 June 2023): Starting from a Derridean grammatological review of the act of writing today, this special issue invites us to consider writing-the-future along with the future-of-writing. While most science fiction and utopian texts typically query the future, some also develop symbols and codes, technologies of writing, a whole new language. The question is framed by our contemporary experience: Writing and the memory of the hand are becoming obsolete by way of typing and other technical proxies. At the same time, Chinese, Arabic, Roman typographies assume a new visuality and transformative power that veers toward the asemic, reminding us of enactment and embodiment in the digital world. Emancipated from the demand for readability, they re-claim the value of an a-synchronized togetherness - a technical as well as aesthetic value. (Guest editors: Dajuin Yao and Nikita Lin, originating from an intermedia investigative project by Dajuin Yao and the Open Media Lab at the School of Intermedia Art, China Academy of Art)

New Call for Contributions: "Computational Models and Metaphors of the Mind" (Deadline: 5 September 2023) Is the meaning of a text accessible to machine learning? Questions like these have become ever more puzzling. Mind, behavior, and machine are configured differently at different times, in different research programs. This concerns questions of intelligence, technology, and language: What is consciousness, is it possible to artificially reproduce it? What is a language in terms of information theory and data models? Can a language be expressive without ontology or semantics? How significant are shared features of brains and computers - e.g. neural networks, and how significant are the differences between human and machine intelligence - e.g. conceptual vs. statistical thinking? (guest editor: Pavel Baryshnikov)

Queries, suggestions, and submissions can be addressed to soctech@spbstu.ru or to Daria Bylieva (bylieva_ds@spbstu.ru) and Alfred Nordmann (nordmann@phil.tu-darmstadt.de).

Call for Papers: Conflict and Controversy in the Classroom

The questions of what topics should be taught as controversial and how they should be taught have recently received considerable attention both in the philosophy of education and in the wider public. The debate about adequate criteria - such as epistemic, behavioural, or political criteria - for distinguishing between controversial and non-controversial issues and deriving appropriate means for addressing them in public schools touches upon a variety of important theoretical and practical challenges. These challenges concern, among others, the civic role and authority of the teacher as a representative of the liberal state, as well as the distinction between indoctrination and legitimate forms of democratic and moral education. The task of dealing with controversial issues in the classroom is a politically fraught and practically complex challenge for teachers. As representatives of the liberal state and as educators in polarized political environments, teachers have to find ways to reconcile the necessity of impartiality in democratic education with the equally important goal of cultivating concrete civic dispositions and virtues in students that will make them active stewards of democratic life. In this vein, teachers have been increasingly exposed to allegations of political partiality or even indoctrination by political movements, parties and parents. In Germany, the Netherlands and in other countries in and outside of Europe, right-wing political parties have filed complaints against teachers for being non-neutral with respect to their political agenda, while left-wing politicians and theorists have encouraged forms of educational influence that overstep important democratic boundaries.  As a result of these different expectations and demands, teachers must deal with a variety of conflicts, dilemmas and challenges when they address controversial issues in the classroom. How should teachers balance the tensions between engaging students in 'authentic' political controversies and creating a fair and inclusive classroom climate? Are they allowed to disclose their own political opinions? How should teachers respond to illiberal and anti-democratic statements in the classroom? What impact and role do differing sociopolitical contexts have in shaping the way teachers and students deal with controversial issues? And what are the differences that should be taken into account when teaching controversial issues in civics education and other subject areas?

This conference aims to deepen our understanding of the current "controversy over controversies" by focusing both on more general questions concerning the theory and practice of teaching controversial issues as well on the analysis of more domain- and subject-specific real-world cases in different sociopolitical contexts. In so doing, we hope to offer some concrete guidelines for addressing the difficult theoretical and practical challenges it raises.

The conference will take place at VU Amsterdam from 22.-23. September 2023. Those interested in participating need to submit a short abstract (about 300 words) as well as a short bio (two or three sentences) by the 15th of March 2023 to johannes.drerup@tu-dortmund.de. In case of acceptance, a first draft of complete papers will be due by the end of August 2023. The papers should cover not more than 6000 words (including references) and will be circulated among the participants two weeks before the conference. It is expected that all participants read the papers in advance of the conference. The results of the conference will be published in an edited volume.

Organized by Johannes Drerup (VU Amsterdam/TU Dortmund), Dorothee Gronostay (TU Dortmund) & Douglas Yacek (TU Dortmund)

Call for Papers: Sinn und Bedeutung 28

Sinn und Bedeutung 28 will take place at Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) from September 5-8, 2023. The conference is jointly organized by the RUB Department of Linguistics, the Linguistic Data Science Lab, the Department of German Language and Literature, and the Departments of Philosophy I and II. The conference will feature a three-day main session (Sept. 6-8) and two parallel one-day special sessions on The Semantics and Pragmatics of Co-Speech / Co-Sign Communication and on Big Data in Semantics and Pragmatics (Sept. 5).

Conference Website: https://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/sub28/

Invited Speakers (main session):
-- Dorothy Ahn (Rutgers University)
-- Hazel Pearson (Queen Mary University of London)
-- Graham Priest (City University of New York, University of Melbourne, RUB)

Invited Speakers (special sessions):
Semantics and Pragmatics of Co-Speech / Co-Sign Communication
-- Cornelia Ebert (Goethe University Frankfurt)

Big Data in Semantics and Pragmatics
-- Racquel Fernandez (University of Amsterdam)

Call for Papers
see https://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/sub28/call.html.en

Important Dates:
-- Submission deadline: March 15, 2023
-- Notification of acceptance: May 30, 2023
-- Special sessions: September 5, 2023
-- Main session: September 6-8, 2023

Organizers:
-- Kristina Liefke (RUB Philosophy II)
-- Ralf Klabunde (RUB Linguistics, Linguistic Data Science Lab)
-- Agata Renans (RUB Linguistics)
-- Daniel Gutzmann (RUB German Language & Literature)
-- Tatjana Scheffler (RUB German Language & Literature)
-- Dolf Rami (RUB Philosophy I)
-- Heinrich Wansing (RUB Philosophy I)
-- Markus Werning (RUB Philosophy II)

Email: sub28@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

Call for Papers: WOW – Workshop on Welfare 2023

Information on the workshop
Considerations about welfare, the value of welfare and its distribution within populations are central to moral philosophy. They are of particular concern for all philosophers who take welfare to be (at least) one source for normative reasons. And, regardless of any deontic implications, welfare axiology also provides an array of fascinating philosophical questions.

What is personal goodness and what constitutes well-being (or ill-being)?
Is well-being purely subjective and should we accept a resonance constraint on welfare?
Can we circumvent problems like ones raised by the experience machine or desires with post-mortal content?
What accounts of pleasure, desire or objective goods are compatible with classical theories of welfare?
How does the welfare of persons relate to value assessments of populations?
Does the aggregation of individual welfare require a shift to an impersonal point of view?
Can we extend value assessments to variable populations?
How can we solve problems of variable population comparisons such as the Non-Identity Problem and the Repugnant Conclusion?

This workshop provides a forum for the discussion of those and related questions. It aims at rallying scholars of philosophy to expand our understanding in these issues, and we hope to promote the
philosophicalengagement with welfare axiology.

Keynote speakers are
Gwen Bradford (Rice University)
Krister Bykvist (Stockholm University)

Call for Papers
We are inviting submissions for talks, which should be between 20 and 30 minutes in length. We are particularly interested in current or future research projects, and especially welcome submissions from philosophers in an early stage of their academic career and from underrepresented groups in academic philosophy. To propose a talk, please send an abstract of approximately 500 words as a PDF attachment to workshoponwelfare@gmail.com. The abstract should be suitable for blind review, i.e. it should not contain any information that may identify you as the author. The deadline for submission is 15 March 2023. You will be notified about the acceptance of your paper latest by 15 April 2023. Please make sure that the e-mail to which the abstract is attached contains your name, institutional affiliation, and the title of the paper.

The workshop will start on 12 July at 11 at Saarland University, Germany. The talks will be finished on 13 July by 5 pm at the latest, but we would be delighted if participants stay for dinner on the second day of the workshop as well.

The workshop is organised by Jonas Harney (Saarland University) and Thorsten Helfer (Saarland University), and generously supported by GUS (Gesellschaft für Utilitarismusstudien), GAP (Gesellschaft für Analytische Philosophy) & UdS Professorship for Practical Philosophy.

More details and updates on https://tinyurl.com/yzman4ay . For further information please contact the organisers: jonas.harney@uni-saarland.de or thorsten.helfer@uni-saarland.de

Call for Papers: The Ancient Philosopher's Toolkit

To reflect on the philosophical method is as old as the philosophical practice itself. While well-known methods such as the Socratic elenchus or dialectic have received a lot of attention in the history of philosophy, there is, however, a host of methodological patterns and strategies that have been relatively neglected. In order to explore such neglected tools, we are organizing The Ancient Philosopher's Toolkit conference, to be held jointly at the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Technische Universität Dortmund, from 16 to 17 November 2023.

We are inviting papers on the uses and role of strategies such as, but not restricted to, the following: anecdotes like Thales falling into the well; analogies such as the comparison between art and nature; metaphors as in the Pythagorean presentation of hedonists as leaky jars; etymologies, like the  explanatory derivation of ethics from ethos in Aristotle; thought patterns based on symmetry,  proportion and other structuring principles such as Heraclitus' use of comparisons of type A is to B as B  is to C; the use of counterexamples or hard-cases, as the just person that is happy to be seen as  unjust in the Republic; the strategy of playing the role of your philosophical opponent, or strategic  presentation of philosophical predecessors, as we may find it in Aristotle's Metaphysics.

The conference will take place in person, one day at the Ruhr Universität Bochum and one day at the  TU Dortmund. We have five invited speakers - Orna Harari, Colin King, Glenn Most, MM McCabe, and Christof Rapp. And we will invite five to six further speakers through this call for papers. We are looking  for extended abstracts or full papers from scholars working on these themes. Each presenter will be  given a one-hour time slot - roughly 30-45 minutes for presentation and the rest of the time for  discussion. We will be able to cover accommodation and travel costs within Europe.

Important details:
* Extended Abstracts should be 1000-1500 words; full papers are also acceptable.
* Papers can be submitted in English or German.
* Applicants should remove any identifying information on the abstract and include a separate document with their name, email, and affiliation.
* Abstracts or papers should be sent as pdf documents to cvb909@gmail.com.
* The subject of the email should be "Submission - Toolkit Conference".
* The submission deadline is 20 March 2023.

The Organizing Team: Anna Pavani, Barbara Sattler, Celso Vieira, Jeong-joo Lee, Ronja Hildebrandt, Philipp Steinkrüger

X. Tagung für Praktische Philosophie

Die X. Tagung für Praktische Philosophie wird am 28. und 29. September 2023 an der Universität Salzburg stattfinden. Die zwei Plenarvorträge werden von Tim Henning und Rahel Jaeggi gehalten werden. Die Einreichung von Vorschlägen für Vorträge, Panels und Runde Tische ist bis 1. April 2023 per Mail an rechtsphilosophinnen@plus.ac.at möglich.

Das Organisationsteam lädt alle interessierten Kolleg:innen, mit und ohne universitäre Anbindung, aus dem gesamten Spektrum der praktischen Philosophie (angewandte Philosophie, Sozialphilosophie, Ethik, Rechtsphilosophie, politische Philosophie etc.) und verwandter Disziplinen ein, Vorschläge einzusenden.

Die Konferenzsprache ist Deutsch, Vorträge in Englisch sind möglich.

Alle weiteren Informationen und die Möglichkeit zur Einreichung eines Vorschlags sind auf der Konferenzwebseite: https://www.tagung-praktische-philosophie.org/

Gottfried Schweiger und Michael Zichy
(Organisatoren)

Call for papers: Moral Philosophy and Politics

Special Issue on "The Future of Work, Play, and Education in the Metaverse"

Guest Editors

Nir Eisikovits (Director, Center for Applied Ethics, UMass Boston)
James Hughes (IEET Executive Director and Associate Provost, UMass Boston)
Alec Stubbs (UMass Boston Post-Doctoral Fellow)

With Facebook's rebranding to Meta in 2021, the concept of 'the metaverse' became a ubiquitous term overnight, inviting both excitement and intense skepticism about the possibilities of our digital future. Broadly speaking, 'the metaverse' refers to the emerging online network of three-dimensional, virtual worlds facilitated by virtual and augmented reality technologies. As a proposed successor to our current model of the internet, the metaverse offers a virtual counterpart to our physical world that can accommodate our lives of work, play, and education. Three-dimensional workspaces - whether facilitated by virtual reality or augmented reality headsets - represent new immersive environments for social interaction, community-building, productivity, and learning. From virtual office spaces to interactive classrooms populated with three-dimensional avatars, the metaverse promises a new era of social connectivity on the internet. But while the metaverse presents us with these new opportunities, it also intensifies pre-existing philosophical and normative concerns associated with our online lives. If the metaverse lives up to its hype, we must be able to contend with its moral and social consequences.

This special issue of Moral Philosophy and Politics invites submissions that address some of the following philosophical concerns:

  • What are the moral risks and possibilities for the future of work, play, and education in the metaverse?
  • Do we lose something meaningful in our social relations without physical co-presence; or does the metaverse present us with the opportunity for more authentic social relations online?
  • Will work in the metaverse reproduce or reduce work intensification, exploitation, alienation, discrimination, etc.?
  • How ought we think about the problems of distraction, addiction, and anxiety associated with digital technologies in relation to a life in the metaverse?
  • How will facial recognition and haptic feedback technologies associated with the metaverse impact moral and regulatory concerns related to data privacy and surveillance?
  • How ought we conceptualize property relations, such as non-fungible token (NFTs) and other forms of virtual property, in the metaverse?
  • We are particularly interested in submissions that address these various philosophical challenges as they relate to work, play, and education in the metaverse.

Potential philosophical topics for inclusion in this special issue include:

  • The problem of 'authenticity' and co-presence in the metaverse
  • Interoperability of identity and property within and across the metaverse
  • Distraction and addiction in the metaverse
  • The digital divide and the metaverse
  • Big data, data privacy, and surveillance in the metaverse
  • Democratizing the metaverse
  • Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and virtual property

Papers should be between 3.000 and 10.000 words in length and should be submitted by 1 July 2023, with the aim of publishing the special issue in Autumn 2024.

The journal's manuscript submission site can be accessed at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/mopp.

Call for Papers: Special Issue 'Longtermism: Philosophical Questions'

Longtermism is the view that positively influencing the long-term future is a - or perhaps the - key moral priority of our time (see e.g. MacAskill, What We Owe the Future).  The standard argument for this view is simple: the long-term future might concern the fate of enormously many beings; these beings matter morally (at least roughly) as much as we or our contemporaries do; and we can affect their existence and quality of life. The upshot seems to be that positively shaping the next hundreds of thousands of years is more important than just about anything else. When we ponder how to structure our economy, how to respond to climate change, pursue international politics and so on, we should ask primarily how our decisions will impact the very long-term trajectory of the universe.

This is a radical idea, and it deserves much more academic discussion than it has so far received. Moral Philosophy and Politics invites contributions that engage with philosophical questions surrounding longtermism. Is the standard argument sound? What are the primary philosophical objections against it? Are there alternative argumentative routes - perhaps grounded in key deontological or virtue-ethical ideas - that lead to a similar conclusion? What would longtermism imply for our self-understanding today? What import does it have for specific moral issues, such as animal ethics, the ethics of AI or global inequality?

These are only some of the questions that contributors may address.

Papers should be submitted by 31 October 2023 and should be between 3,000 and 10,000 words in length.

All submissions will undergo MOPP's double-blind refereeing process. Please note that this process is not organized by the guest editor but by the journal's founding editors who will also have the final word on publication decisions.

The journal's manuscript submission site can be accessed at
http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/mopp.